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[News of the Week] Around the World

News from Science Magazine - Fri, 06/01/2012 - 11:27am
In science news around the world this week, France's latest attempt to keep genetically modified crops from its fields was rebuked by a scientific panel at the European Food Safety Authority; a Senate committee wants to sink the U.S. military's biofuels program; police prevented U.K. activists from destroying an experiment to test a strain of genetically modified wheat; and the European Commission said that open access "will be the norm" for studies funded through Europe's £80 billion Horizon 2020 research program.

[News of the Week] Random Sample

News from Science Magazine - Fri, 06/01/2012 - 11:27am
The Innovative Medicines Initiative has launched a new €220 million collaboration of companies and public partners to combat antimicrobial resistance. Some organisms from sea-floor vent systems may survive long enough on deep-sea submersibles to travel to another undersea spot. The speedy digging strategy of a humble clam may help underwater robots stay parked over the sea floor. And this week's numbers quantify California condors required for delisting under the U.S. Endangered Species Act, the percentage of the U.S. Southern High Plains that won't sustain irrigation within 30 years, and metric tons of carbon dioxide emitted globally in 2011.

[News of the Week] Newsmakers

News from Science Magazine - Fri, 06/01/2012 - 11:27am
This week's Newsmaker is Allison Macfarlane, an academic geologist and nuclear waste expert, who is in line to be the next head of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

[News & Analysis] Radio Astronomy: Telescope Project Splits Array to Avoid Division

News from Science Magazine - Fri, 06/01/2012 - 11:27am
The member states of the Square Kilometre Array radio telescope have decided to split the €1.5 billion project between the two potential hosts: South Africa and Australia/New Zealand.

Author: Daniel Clery

[News & Analysis] Archaeology: Early Dates for Artistic Europeans

News from Science Magazine - Fri, 06/01/2012 - 11:27am
New radiocarbon dates of artworks found in a cave in southwest Germany suggest to some researchers that certain artistic behaviors emerged first in Europe rather than Africa.

Author: Michael Balter

[News & Analysis] Astronomy: Creative Deal Gives NASA Telescope New Lease on Life

News from Science Magazine - Fri, 06/01/2012 - 11:27am
A satellite that had been scheduled to be shut down now has a fresh lease on life, thanks to a first-of-a-kind arrangement between the federal government and a research university.

Author: Yudhijit Bhattacharjee

[News & Analysis] Psychiatry: Criticism Continues to Dog Psychiatric Manual as Deadline Approaches

News from Science Magazine - Fri, 06/01/2012 - 11:27am
Less than a year before a new edition of the diagnostic reference for psychiatric illnesses is to be released, the controversy it has generated continues.

Author: Greg Miller

[News Focus] Mysteries of Astronomy

News from Science Magazine - Fri, 06/01/2012 - 11:27am


Author: Robert Coontz

[News Focus] Astronomy: What Is Dark Energy?

News from Science Magazine - Fri, 06/01/2012 - 11:27am
The nature of the "dark energy" that is causing the expansion of the universe to accelerate is now perhaps the most profound mystery in cosmology and astrophysics. And it may remain forever so.

Author: Adrian Cho

[News Focus] Astronomy: How Hot Is Dark Matter?

News from Science Magazine - Fri, 06/01/2012 - 11:27am
Astronomers still don't know what the unseen "dark matter" is that provides the gravity that holds the galaxies together, but they may soon be able to narrow in on its most basic properties.

Author: Adrian Cho

[News Focus] Astronomy: Where Are the Missing Baryons?

News from Science Magazine - Fri, 06/01/2012 - 11:27am
Not only are astronomers unable to pin down dark energy and dark matter, but more than half of the "baryonic matter"—ordinary atoms and ions—remains unaccounted for.

Author: Yudhijit Bhattacharjee

[News Focus] Astronomy: How Do Stars Explode?

News from Science Magazine - Fri, 06/01/2012 - 11:27am
Many details of what goes on inside a star when its fuel has been spent and it explodes into a giant fireball known as a supernova, as well as how that explosion unfolds, remain a mystery.

Author: Yudhijit Bhattacharjee

[News Focus] Astronomy: What Reionized the Universe?

News from Science Magazine - Fri, 06/01/2012 - 11:27am
A few hundred million years after the big bang, most of the universe's matter turned into the light-transmitting ionized plasma that it remains today. What caused this cosmic reionization? No one is sure.

Author: Edwin Cartlidge

[News Focus] Astronomy: What's the Source of the Most Energetic Cosmic Rays?

News from Science Magazine - Fri, 06/01/2012 - 11:27am
Data taken from detectors in the past few years have provided some clues to the origin of the highest energy cosmic rays but, as yet, no smoking gun.

Author: Daniel Clery

[News Focus] Astronomy: Why Is the Solar System So Bizarre?

News from Science Magazine - Fri, 06/01/2012 - 11:27am
Enigmas such as Mercury's makeup (mostly iron core, with a thin veneer of rock) and Uranus's skewed magnetic field continue to bedevil planetary scientists, and no tidy resolution is in sight.

Author: Richard A. Kerr

[News Focus] Astronomy: Why Is the Sun's Corona So Hot?

News from Science Magazine - Fri, 06/01/2012 - 11:27am
How does heat dissipating from the sun's core out beyond the surface to its corona abruptly punch temperatures up by a factor of 200 and more?

Author: Richard A. Kerr

2012 NBA Draft: New Orleans Hornets Can Learn From Spurs and Thunder Blueprints - International Business Times

Google News - Fri, 06/01/2012 - 11:16am

International Business Times

2012 NBA Draft: New Orleans Hornets Can Learn From Spurs and Thunder Blueprints
International Business Times
By Charles Dunson: Subscribe to Charles's RSS feed Things are looking up for the New Orleans Hornets after they were awarded 2012's No.1 overall pick in a conspiracy-filled NBA Draft lottery. "I won a national championship in New Orleans, ...

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Categories: Misc

Tomato Genome Project Bears Fruit After Nearly A Decade - International Business Times

Google News - Fri, 06/01/2012 - 11:06am

International Business Times

Tomato Genome Project Bears Fruit After Nearly A Decade
International Business Times
By Roxanne Palmer: Subscribe to Roxanne's RSS feed Ketchup enthusiasts, rejoice! Scientists have cracked the tomato's genetic code and hope to use its secrets to breed hardier, heartier crops that can withstand global warming and disease.

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Categories: Misc

Google Chrome Tabs Let Malware Sneak Into Businesses - InformationWeek

Pipe Feed - Fri, 06/01/2012 - 11:06am

Google Chrome Tabs Let Malware Sneak Into Businesses
InformationWeek
Using Google Chrome tabs, malware could piggyback into a corporate environment in two ways. By Mathew J. Schwartz InformationWeek Google Chrome users: Watch your sync habits. The browser's ability to synchronize tabs across different computers could be ...

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Categories: Misc

US Job Growth Falters In May - Is QE3 By Fed Up Ahead? - International Business Times

Google News - Fri, 06/01/2012 - 11:06am

US Job Growth Falters In May - Is QE3 By Fed Up Ahead?
International Business Times
By Moran Zhang: Subscribe to Moran's RSS feed A third straight month of disappointing job data clearly suggests that the US labor market conditions are deteriorating again, which economists say will undoubtedly prompt more speculation that a third ...

Categories: Misc