News from BioSpace.com

Syndicate content BioSpace.com
Updated: 2 years 29 weeks ago

Genetic Variant Increases Risk of Heart Rhythm Dysfunction, Sudden Death, University of Cincinnati Study

Wed, 05/30/2012 - 8:00pm
Cardiovascular researchers at the University of Cincinnati have identified a genetic variant in a cardiac protein that can be linked to heart rhythm dysfunction. This is the first genetic variant in a calcium-binding protein (histidine-rich calcium binding protein) found to be associated with ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death in dilated cardiomyopathy patients, opening up new possibilities...

Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU) Researchers Say Tart Cherries Have "the Highest Anti-Inflammatory Content of Any Food"

Wed, 05/30/2012 - 8:00pm
LANSING, Mich., May 30, 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- Tart cherries may help reduce chronic inflammation, especially for the millions of Americans suffering from debilitating joint pain and arthritis, according to new research from Oregon Health & Science University presented today at the American College of Sports Medicine Conference (ACSM) in San Francisco, Calif.(1) In fact, the researchers suggest tart...

Fish Fatty Acid Protects Vision in Seniors, University of Alberta Study

Wed, 05/30/2012 - 8:00pm
An omega-3 fatty acid found in fish, known as DHA, prevented age-related vision loss in lab tests, demonstrates recently published medical research from the University of Alberta. Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry researcher Yves Sauve and his team discovered lab models fed DHA did not accumulate a toxic molecule at the back of the eyes. The toxin normally builds up in the retina with age and causes...

Potential New HIV Vaccine/Therapy Target, University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) Study

Wed, 05/30/2012 - 8:00pm
After being infected with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) in a laboratory study, rhesus macaques that had more of a certain type of immune cell in their gut than others had much lower levels of the virus in their blood, and for six months after infection were better able to control the virus.

What Your Picture Says About Your Background, Reveals

Wed, 05/30/2012 - 8:00pm
For millions of its Western users, the picture they choose to illustrate themselves on Facebook is an important decision to make. They know it can be the first impression that anyone in the world receives of them, so they're often deeply conscious of what features are displayed and what flaws are hidden by their chosen image. But despite their careful deliberation the decision may not be a personal...

Ketamine Improved Bipolar Depression Within Minutes, National Institute of Mental Health Study

Wed, 05/30/2012 - 8:00pm
Bipolar disorder is a serious and debilitating condition where individuals experience severe swings in mood between mania and depression. The episodes of low or elevated mood can last days or months, and the risk of suicide is high.

Taste and Smell Control What We Eat, Oregon State University Study

Wed, 05/30/2012 - 8:00pm
Researchers at Oregon State University have made some fundamental discoveries about how people taste, smell and detect flavor, and why they love some foods much more than others. The findings could lead to the Holy Grail of nutrition -- helping people learn to really LIKE vegetables.

Bananas Are as Beneficial as Sports Drinks, Appalachian State University Study

Wed, 05/30/2012 - 8:00pm
Bananas have long been a favorite source of energy for endurance and recreational athletes. Bananas are a rich source of potassium and other nutrients, and are easy for cyclists, runners or hikers to carry. Research conducted at Appalachian State University's Human Performance Lab in the Kannapolis-based North Carolina Research Campus (NCRC) has revealed additional benefits.

New Research Shows Runners Can Improve Health and Performance With Less Training, University of Copenhagen Study

Wed, 05/30/2012 - 8:00pm
The new 10-20-30 training concept can improve both a person's running performance and health, despite a significant reduction in the total amount of training. This is the conclusion of a study from University of Copenhagen researchers just published in the renowned scientific Journal of Applied of Physiology.

Scientists Map the Tomato's Genome, Cornell University Study

Wed, 05/30/2012 - 8:00pm
For the first time, the genome of the tomato, Solanum lycopersicum, has been decoded, and it becomes an important step toward improving yield, nutrition, disease resistance, taste and color of the tomato and other crops. The full genome sequence, as well as the sequence of a wild relative, is jointly published in the latest issue of the journal Nature.

Children Exposed to the Common Pollutant Naphthalene Show Signs of Chromosomal Damage, and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Study

Tue, 05/29/2012 - 8:00pm
According to a new study, children exposed to high levels of the common air pollutant naphthalene are at increased risk for chromosomal aberrations (CAs), which have been previously associated with cancer. These include chromosomal translocations, a potentially more harmful and long-lasting subtype of CAs.

21st Century Bloodletting Reduces Cardiovascular Risk, Study

Tue, 05/29/2012 - 8:00pm
It seems that while the practice of bloodletting throughout history had little or no effect on most diseases, and the practice was abandoned in the 19th century, new research published in BioMed Central's open access journal BMC Medicine demonstrates that blood donation has real benefits for obese people with metabolic syndrome. Two sessions of bloodletting were enough to improve blood pressure and...

PCB Exposure Linked to Increased Abdominal Fat, Uppsala Universitet Study

Tue, 05/29/2012 - 8:00pm
There is a correlation between high levels of the environmental toxin PCB and the distribution of body fat to the abdomen. This is shown in a new study published May 29 in the scientific journal Obesity. Abdominal fat is already known to increase the risk of diabetes and high blood pressure, among other conditions.

Taking Anti-HIV Meds Prior to Exposure May Help Prevent Infection, Canadian Medical Association Journal Reveals

Tue, 05/29/2012 - 8:00pm
Preventive antiretroviral treatment appears to be an effective way to help protect high-risk people against HIV infection, a new study suggests. HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, can be transmitted through unprotected sex and contaminated needles.

<b>University of Eastern Finland</b> Scientists Discover Vaccine to Eliminate Allergies

Tue, 05/29/2012 - 8:00pm
Lets start with some numbers. In the United States, 65 million people have some type of allergy. In Europe, that number goes up to 87 million. Fifty six percent are allergic to grasses in the US versus 52% in Europe. Cat allergies are 39% in the US and 30% in Europe and food allergies are 10% in the US and 11 % in Europe.

50-Year Cholera Mystery Solved, University of Texas Study

Tue, 05/29/2012 - 8:00pm
For 50 years scientists have been unsure how the bacteria that gives humans cholera manages to resist one of our basic innate immune responses. That mystery has now been solved, thanks to research from biologists at The University of Texas at Austin. The answers may help clear the way for a new class of antibiotics that don't directly shut down pathogenic bacteria such as V. cholerae, but instead...

Antioxidant May Help Children With Autism, Stanford University Study

Tue, 05/29/2012 - 8:00pm
A specific antioxidant supplement may be an effective therapy for some features of autism, according to a pilot trial from the Stanford University School of Medicine and Lucile Packard Children's Hospital that involved 31 children with the disorder.

New HIV-Inhibiting Protein Identified, National Institute of Allergy And Infectious Diseases (NIAID) Study

Tue, 05/29/2012 - 8:00pm
Scientists have identified a new HIV-suppressing protein in the blood of people infected with the virus. In laboratory studies, the protein, called CXCL4 or PF-4, binds to HIV such that it cannot attach to or enter a human cell. The research was led by Paolo Lusso, M.D., Ph.D., chief of the Section of Viral Pathogenesis in the Laboratory of Immunoregulation at the National Institute of Allergy and...

People Born With Certain "Personality Genes" May Live Longer, Albert Einstein College of Medicine Study

Tue, 05/29/2012 - 8:00pm
"It's in their genes" is a common refrain from scientists when asked about factors that allow centenarians to reach age 100 and beyond. Up until now, research has focused on genetic variations that offer a physiological advantage such as high levels of HDL ("good") cholesterol. But researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology of Yeshiva University have...