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<b>GW</b> Researchers Discover Biomarker for Advanced Bile Duct Fibrosis and Bile Duct Cancer

Tue, 05/29/2012 - 8:00pm
GW Researchers, Jeffrey M. Bethony, Ph.D., associate professor of Microbiology, Immunology, and Tropical Medicine, and Paul Brindley, Ph.D., professor of Microbiology, Immunology, and Tropical Medicine at GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences, along with colleagues from Khon Kaen University in Thailand have determined that plasma Interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels are an sensitive and specific biomarker...

Cancer May Require Simpler Genetic Mutations Than Previously Thought, Harvard Medical School Study

Tue, 05/29/2012 - 8:00pm
Chromosomal deletions in DNA often involve just one of two gene copies inherited from either parent. But scientists haven't known how a deletion in one gene from one parent, called a "hemizygous" deletion, can contribute to cancer.

Diabetes Drug Could Be a Promising Therapy for Traumatic Brain Injury, Tel Aviv University Study

Tue, 05/29/2012 - 8:00pm
TAU research finds that existing diabetes medication may ease damage caused by brain-addling explosions. Although the death toll is relatively low for people who suffer from traumatic brain injury (TBI), it can have severe, life-long consequences for brain function. TBI can impair a patient's mental abilities, impact memory and behavior, and lead to dramatic personality changes. And long-term medical...

Aspirin May Prevent Skin Cancer, Study

Tue, 05/29/2012 - 8:00pm
A new study suggests that aspirin and other similar painkillers may help protect against skin cancer. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the findings indicate that skin cancer prevention may be added to the benefits of these commonly used medications.

GlaxoSmithKline Melanoma Drugs May Steal Market From Roche

Mon, 05/28/2012 - 8:00pm
Two experimental skin cancer drugs from GlaxoSmithKline - each designed to block different pathways used by tumour cells - look set to steal a march on Roche's pioneering melanoma treatment Zelboraf, according to Citigroup. The brokerage, which raised its price target on GSK stock on Monday, forecast combined risk-adjusted annual sales for dabrafenib and trametinib of 1.5 billion pounds ($2.35 billion...

Night Shift Might Boost Women's Breast Cancer Risk, Reveals

Mon, 05/28/2012 - 8:00pm
Women who work night shifts are at higher risk of breast cancer, warn researchers. Their findings suggest working at night increases the chances of the disease by 40 per cent. Women working more than two night shifts a week have double the risk of those on day shifts, says a report from scientists, while night workers who also describe themselves as morning people or larks have a stronger risk...

Structure of Human Protein Critical for Silencing Genes Solved, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Study

Mon, 05/28/2012 - 8:00pm
In a study published in the journal Cell on May 24, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) scientists describe the three-dimensional atomic structure of a human protein bound to a piece of RNA that "guides" the protein's ability to silence genes. The protein, Argonaute-2, is a key player in RNA interference (RNAi), a powerful cellular phenomenon that has important roles in diverse biological processes...

Travel to High Altitudes Tied to Crohn's, Colitis Flare-Ups, Study

Mon, 05/28/2012 - 8:00pm
People with inflammatory bowel disease, which includes Crohn's disease and colitis, may be at increased risk for flare-ups when they fly or travel to high altitudes for skiing or mountain climbing, a new study suggests.

New Study Sounds Warning on Hormone Replacement Therapy, Reveals

Mon, 05/28/2012 - 8:00pm
Women who are past menopause and healthy should not take hormone replacement therapy in hopes of warding off dementia, bone fractures or heart disease, says a new analysis by the government task force that weighs the risks and benefits of screening and other therapies aimed at preventing illness.

Skp2 Activates Cancer-Promoting, Glucose-Processing Akt, MD Anderson Study

Mon, 05/28/2012 - 8:00pm
HER2 and its epidermal growth factor receptor cousins mobilize a specialized protein to activate a major player in cancer development and sugar metabolism, scientists report in the May 25 issue of Cell.

Less Couch Time Equals Fewer Cookies, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine Study

Mon, 05/28/2012 - 8:00pm
Simply ejecting your rear from the couch means your hand will spend less time digging into a bag of chocolate chip cookies. That is the simple but profound finding of a new Northwestern Medicine study, which reports simply changing one bad habit has a domino effect on others. Knock down your sedentary leisure time and you'll reduce junk food and saturated fats because you're no longer glued to the...

Gene That Stunts Infants' Growth Also Makes Them Grow Too Big, University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) Study

Mon, 05/28/2012 - 8:00pm
UCLA geneticists have identified the mutation responsible for IMAGe syndrome, a rare disorder that stunts infants' growth. The twist? The mutation occurs on the same gene that causes Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome, which makes cells grow too fast, leading to very large children.

New Clues About Cancer Cell Metabolism Emerge, Broad Institute and Massachusetts General Hospital Study

Mon, 05/28/2012 - 8:00pm
For almost a century, researchers have known that cancer cells have peculiar appetites, devouring glucose in ways that normal cells do not. But glucose uptake may tell only part of cancer's metabolic story. Researchers from the Broad Institute and Massachusetts General Hospital looked across 60 well-studied cancer cell lines, analyzing which of more than 200 metabolites were consumed or released by...

Marked for Destruction: Newly Developed Compound Triggers Cancer Cell Death, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute Study

Mon, 05/28/2012 - 8:00pm
The BCL-2 protein family plays a large role in determining whether cancer cells survive in response to therapy or undergo a form of cell death known as apoptosis. Cells are pressured toward apoptosis by expression of pro-apoptotic BCL-2 proteins. However, cancer cells respond to therapy by increasing expression of anti-apoptotic proteins, which bind and neutralize pro-apoptotic family members and mediate...

Seaweed Chemical Could be Key to Beat Arthritis, University of California, San Diego (UCSD) Study

Mon, 05/28/2012 - 8:00pm
A seaweed considered a threat to the healthy growth of coral reefs in Hawaii may possess the ability to produce substances that could one day treat human diseases, a new study led by scientists at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego has revealed.

Babies Zero in on "Just Right" to Learn, University of Rochester Study

Thu, 05/24/2012 - 8:00pm
Infants ignore information that is too simple or too complex, focusing instead on situations that are just right. Dubbed the Goldilocks effect by the University of Rochester team that discovered it, the attention pattern sheds light on how babies learn to make sense of a world full of complex sights, sounds, and movements.

No New Neurons in the Human Olfactory Bulb, Karolinska Institute Study

Thu, 05/24/2012 - 8:00pm
Research from Karolinska Institutet shows that the human olfactory bulb - a structure in the brain that processes sensory input from the nose - differs from that of other mammals in that no new neurons are formed in this area after birth. The discovery, which is published in the scientific journal Neuron, is based on the age-determination of the cells using the carbon-14 method, and might explain why...

Japanese-American Men With Low Vitamin-D Diet Face Higher Stroke Risk, University of Hawaii Study

Thu, 05/24/2012 - 8:00pm
Japanese-American men who don't eat a diet rich in vitamin D have an increased risk of stroke later in life, according to a new, long-term study. The study included nearly 7,400 Japanese-American men living in Hawaii. They were between the ages of 45 and 68 in the mid- to late-1960s, when they were first examined and interviewed about their eating habits.

Key Gene Found Responsible for Chronic Inflammation, Accelerated Aging and Cancer, NYU Langone Medical Center and School of Medicine Study

Thu, 05/24/2012 - 8:00pm
Researchers at NYU School of Medicine have, for the first time, identified a single gene that simultaneously controls inflammation, accelerated aging and cancer. "This was certainly an unexpected finding," said principal investigator Robert J. Schneider, PhD, the Albert Sabin Professor of Molecular Pathogenesis, associate director for translational research and co-director of the Breast Cancer Program...

Anti-Psychotic Drug Pushes Cancer Stem Cells Over the Edge, McMaster University Study

Thu, 05/24/2012 - 8:00pm
An anti-psychotic drug used to treat schizophrenia appears to get rid of cancer stem cells by helping them differentiate into less threatening cell types. The discovery reported in the Cell Press journal Cell on May 24th comes after researchers screened hundreds of compounds in search of those that would selectively inhibit human cancer stem cells, and it may lead rather swiftly to a clinical trial...