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Synchronized Brains: Feeling Strong Emotions Makes People's Brains "Tick Together,"Study

Thu, 05/24/2012 - 8:00pm
Experiencing strong emotions synchronizes brain activity across individuals, a research team at Aalto University and Turku PET Centre in Finland has revealed. Human emotions are highly contagious. Seeing others' emotional expressions such as smiles triggers often the corresponding emotional response in the observer. Such synchronization of emotional states across individuals may support social interaction...

Male Fertility Genes Discovered, University of Chicago Study

Thu, 05/24/2012 - 8:00pm
A new study has revealed previously undiscovered genetic variants that influence fertility in men. The findings, published by Cell Press on May 24th in the American Journal of Human Genetics, shed much-needed light on human reproduction and might provide answers for countless men suffering from infertility.

Obesity Not Always Tied to Higher Heart Risk, University College London Study

Thu, 05/24/2012 - 8:00pm
An obese person isn't inevitably at increased risk of cardiovascular disease and death, a new U.K. study finds. "The people really at risk are the ones who have obesity in combination with other metabolic health risk factors," said Mark Hamer, a principal research associate at University College London who worked on the study.

Combo Therapy May Help Ease "Ringing in the Ears," Study

Thu, 05/24/2012 - 8:00pm
One in five people suffers from tinnitus, the annoying and sometimes severely debilitating condition often referred to as "ringing in the ears," and new research may offer some hope for relief for these patients. Although the condition currently has no cure, researchers in the Netherlands found that combining two existing therapies may help more than either single therapy alone.

How a Hollywood Celeb Became the Spokeswoman for the Power of Vaccines

Wed, 05/23/2012 - 8:00pm
Ask actress Amanda Peet why she has been doing public awareness campaigns for a United Nations effort to get kids in the developing world vaccinated, and you get the same answer youd get if you asked Bill Gates why he is spending so much to get children their shots:

Well-Connected Brains Make You Smarter in Older Age, University of Edinburgh Study

Wed, 05/23/2012 - 8:00pm
Brains that maintain healthy nerve connections as we age help keep us sharp in later life, new research funded by the charity Age UK has found. Older people with robust brain 'wiring' -- that is, the nerve fibers that connect different, distant brain areas -- can process information quickly and that this makes them generally smarter, the study suggests.

Genetic Markers to Predict Male Fertility Identified, and Study

Wed, 05/23/2012 - 8:00pm
The diagnosis of male fertility is usually performed through the observation of the sperm in the microscope. However, a normal quality semen does not guarantee an adequate fertility. In fact, there is a considerable proportion of cases of unexplained infertility and data suggest that abnormal sperm function may have a genetic or molecular origin.

Childhood Obesity Increases Likelihood of a Cranial Disorder That May Cause Blindness, Kaiser Permanente Study

Wed, 05/23/2012 - 8:00pm
Children who are overweight or obese -- particularly older, non-Hispanic white girls -- are more likely to have a neurological disorder known as idiopathic intracranial hypertension, a rare condition that can result in blindness, according to a new Kaiser Permanente study published in The Journal of Pediatrics. In a cross-sectional, population-based study of 900,000 children ages 2-19 years old, researchers...

Hazelnuts: New Source of Key Fat for Infant Formula That's More Like Mother's Milk, Reveals

Wed, 05/23/2012 - 8:00pm
Scientists are reporting development of a healthy "designer fat" that, when added to infant formula, provides a key nutrient that premature babies need in high quantities, but isn't available in large enough amounts in their mothers' milk. The new nutrient, based on hazelnut oil, also could boost nutrition for babies who are bottle-fed for other reasons. The report appears in ACS' Journal of Agricultural...

Overweight Moms More Apt to Have Large Babies, Mount Sinai Hospital Study

Wed, 05/23/2012 - 8:00pm
Being overweight or obese before and during pregnancy is the most reliable predictor of a woman's risk of giving birth to a large baby, which can increase the chances of cesarean section and other complications during delivery, a new study says. The Canadian study of 472 women also found that elevated levels of blood glucose (sugar) and fats had little effect on the risk of having a big baby. A large...

Calcium Supplements May Be Bad for Your Heart, Study

Wed, 05/23/2012 - 8:00pm
People who take calcium supplements could be increasing their risk of having a heart attack, according to researchers in Germany. Calcium is often taken by older people to strengthen bones and prevent fractures. But the study, published in the journal Heart, said the supplements "should be taken with caution".

Mouse Study Sheds Light on How Diet May Affect Epilepsy, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School Study

Wed, 05/23/2012 - 8:00pm
A new study unravels a link between a protein that can modify cellular metabolism in the brain and seizure susceptibility. The research, published by Cell Press in the May 24th issue of the journal Neuron, may lead to the development of new treatments for epilepsy.

Resilient People More Satisfied With Life, Study

Wed, 05/23/2012 - 8:00pm
When confronted with adverse situations such as the loss of a loved one, some people never fully recover from the pain. Others, the majority, pull through and experience how the intensity of negative emotions (e.g. anxiety, depression) grows dimmer with time until they adapt to the new situation. A third group is made up of individuals whose adversities have made them grow personally and whose life...

WWII Chemical Exposure May Pass Down Disease, University of Texas Study

Wed, 05/23/2012 - 8:00pm
The World War II generation may have passed down to their grandchildren the effects of chemical exposure in the 1940s, possibly explaining current rates of obesity, autism and mental illness, according to one researcher. David Crews, professor of psychology and zoology at the University of Texas at Austin, theorized that the rise in these diseases may be linked to environmental effects passed on through...

Fever During Pregnancy More Than Doubles the Risk of Autism or Developmental Delay, University of California, Davis (UCD) Study

Wed, 05/23/2012 - 8:00pm
A team of UC Davis researchers has found that mothers who had fevers during their pregnancies were more than twice as likely to have a child with autism or developmental delay than were mothers of typically developing children, and that taking medication to treat fever countered its effect.

"Obesity Genes" May Influence Food Choices, Eating Patterns, Study

Wed, 05/23/2012 - 8:00pm
Blame it on your genes? Researchers from The Miriam Hospital's Weight Control and Diabetes Research Center say individuals with variations in certain "obesity genes" tend to eat more meals and snacks, consume more calories per day and often choose the same types of high fat, sugary foods.

Children's Body Fat Linked to Vitamin D Insufficiency in Mothers, University of Southampton Study

Wed, 05/23/2012 - 8:00pm
Children are more likely to have more body fat during childhood if their mother has low levels of Vitamin D during pregnancy, according to scientists at the Medical Research Council Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit (MRC LEU), University of Southampton.

Do Bald Men Face Higher Risk of Prostate Cancer? University of Toronto Study

Wed, 05/23/2012 - 8:00pm
Got hair? If you don't, you might have a higher risk of prostate cancer, a preliminary study suggests. Researchers are reporting that bald men who underwent biopsies of the prostate were more likely to have cancer than were those with more hair on their heads.

Rapid DNA Sequencing May Soon be Routine Part of Each Patient's Medical Record, According to

Tue, 05/22/2012 - 8:00pm
Rapid DNA sequencing may soon become a routine part of each individual's medical record, providing enormous information previously sequestered in the human genome's 3 billion nucleotide bases. The journal Science describes recent advances in sequencing technology. Stuart Lindsay, director of the Biodesign Institute's Center for Single Molecule Biophysics has just successfully addressed a central stumbling...

<b>The Street:</b> A List of the Top Drug Studies Left in 2012

Tue, 05/22/2012 - 8:00pm
Drug approval decisions garner big headlines, but savvy and successful biotech investors know that making smart trading decisions ahead of important clinical trial results is the ticket to banking serious coin. The market value of Vertex Pharmaceuticals(VRTX_) has jumped by $5 billion in the past three weeks based solely on positive, interim results from a phase II cystic fibrosis trial. That stands...