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Who???s on Biotech???s Endangered Species List? Mid-Sized Drug Developers

Sun, 05/20/2012 - 8:00pm
Only a few companies have ever been successful enough to call themselves Big Biotechs. If boards and shareholders lack vision and guts, well look back in a few years and wonder why the Big Biotechs went extinct. The group of Big Biotechs includes companies like Amgen, Gilead Sciences, Biogen Idec, and Celgene. They grew from scrappy venture-backed startups with a dream into big, independent, profitable...

All Baby Boomers Should be Tested for Hep C: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

Sun, 05/20/2012 - 8:00pm
One in 30 baby boomers may be infected with the hepatitis C virus, but few know it until it's too late for their livers. In the wake of new statistics showing more than 2 million baby boomers in the U.S. are infected with hepatitis C, the CDC is proposing new guidelines calling for all adults of that generation to be tested for the virus.

Gene Opens Unique Way to Attack Anxiety, University of Chicago Study

Sun, 05/20/2012 - 8:00pm
Researchers testing the role of a mysterious gene have identified a new target for drugs designed to treat anxiety. The study, published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, shows that animals with multiple copies of the Glo1 gene were more likely to exhibit anxiety-like behavior in laboratory tests. Further experiments showed that Glo1 increased anxiety-like behavior by lowering levels of methylglyoxal...

Research With Dogs Points to Early Test for Arthritis, University of Missouri Study

Sun, 05/20/2012 - 8:00pm
A new test that can detect and predict osteoarthritis before patients experience symptoms was developed by analyzing the joints of dogs with arthritis. Osteoarthritis, the most common form of arthritis, affects more than 27 million adults in the United States. Early detection of the disease, which causes pain and swelling in the joints, would allow better treatment options, according to the University...

Discovery of Mechanisms Predicting Response to New Treatments in Colon Cancer, Study

Sun, 05/20/2012 - 8:00pm
The Stem Cells and Cancer Research Group headed by Dr Hctor G. Palmer at the Vall d'Hebrn Institute of Oncology (VHIO) has identified the molecular mechanisms that determine patients' response to certain drugs used in clinical trials for colon cancer treatment. The study led by VHIO also benefited from the collaboration with Professor Alberto Muozs laboratory at the Instituto de Investigaciones...

New Target to Battle Rheumatoid Arthritis, Hospital for Special Surgery Study

Sun, 05/20/2012 - 8:00pm
A new study led by researchers at Hospital for Special Surgery identifies the mechanism by which a cell signaling pathway contributes to the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In addition, the study provides evidence that drugs under development for diseases such as cancer could potentially be used to treat RA. Rheumatoid arthritis, a systemic inflammatory autoimmune disease that can be crippling...

Red Meat and Butter "Could Raise Alzheimer's Risk," Harvard University Study

Sun, 05/20/2012 - 8:00pm
Eating too much red meat, butter and other foods that contain high levels of saturated fats could increase the risk of Alzheimer's, according to a study. US researchers linked to Harvard University found older women who ate lots of food high in saturated fats had worse memories than others. By contrast, those who ate more monounsaturated fats - found in olive oil, sunflower oil, seeds, nuts and avocados...

It's Not Just What You Eat, It's When You Eat, Salk Institute for Biological Studies Study

Sun, 05/20/2012 - 8:00pm
It turns out that when we eat may be as important as what we eat. Scientists at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies have found that regular eating times and extending the daily fasting period may override the adverse health effects of a high-fat diet and prevent obesity, diabetes and liver disease in mice.

Breast Cancer Treated With Celery Extract, University of Missouri Study

Sun, 05/20/2012 - 8:00pm
A natural substance found in celery and parsley shows promise as a non-toxic treatment for an aggressive breast cancer.University of Missouri researchers found the substance, called apigenin, shrank a type of breast cancer tumor that is stimulated by progestin, a synthetic hormone given to women to ease symptoms related to menopause. Findings are reported in the journal Hormones and Cancer.

Oxytocin Improves Brain Function in Children With Autism, Yale University School Of Medicine Sudy

Sun, 05/20/2012 - 8:00pm
Preliminary results from an ongoing, large-scale study by Yale School of Medicine researchers shows that oxytocin -- a naturally occurring substance produced in the brain and throughout the body -- increased brain function in regions that are known to process social information in children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorders (ASD).

Can Coffee Kill You?

Sun, 05/20/2012 - 8:00pm
Scribblers like me cant resist coffee news. Scientists toil for monthspresumably in windowless labs full of microscopes and pipettesto collect, sort, and interpret mountains of data about the health effects of the worlds most popular drug and publish the results in meticulous detail in a peer-reviewed journal. And, after downing probably a little more than our share of the 400 million cups of coffee...

Folic Acid May Reduce Some Childhood Cancers, Washington University in St. Louis Study

Sun, 05/20/2012 - 8:00pm
Folic acid fortification of foods may reduce the incidence of the most common type of kidney cancer and a type of brain tumors in children, finds a new study by Kimberly J. Johnson, PhD, assistant professor at the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis, and Amy Linabery, PhD, postdoctoral fellow at the University of Minnesota. Incidence reductions were found for Wilms' tumor, a type of...

The Incredible Shrinking Salesforce? Not Everywhere - Big Drugmakers Like Boehringer Ingelheim Corporation, Novo Nordisk A/S are Still Hiring!

Thu, 05/17/2012 - 8:00pm
Between 2010 and 2011, drugmakers trimmed their sales teams by 7 percent. But despite the huge number of sales reps being thrown overboard in recent years, select hiring does still occur. The obvious impetus is when a new drug is approved by the FDA. Of course, such hiring may not compensate for lost jobs, but several drugmakers last year did grow their sales forces, according to a new report from...

Government Retains UK's Strict Animal Testing Regime

Thu, 05/17/2012 - 8:00pm
The UK says it will retain stricter animal testing standards than required by a new European Union Directive. The Home Office Minister, Lynne Featherstone, said that special protection for dogs cats and primates would be maintained.

Panel Debates: Should We Test Anthrax Vaccine On Kids?

Thu, 05/17/2012 - 8:00pm
The Obama administration is asking a presidential commission to help decide an ethical quandary: Should the anthrax vaccine and other treatments being stockpiled in case of a bioterror attack be tested in children? "We can't just assume that what we have for adults works for children," Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius told the panel Thursday.

Training the Brain Could Help Reduce Pain, University of South Australia Study

Thu, 05/17/2012 - 8:00pm
Training the brain to reduce pain could be a promising approach for treating phantom limb pain and complex regional pain syndrome, according to an internationally known neuroscience researcher speaking May 17 at the American Pain Society's Annual Scientific Meeting.

Statins May Help Healthy Adults, Oxford University Study

Thu, 05/17/2012 - 8:00pm
Thousands of heart attacks and strokes could be prevented if the cholesterol-lowering drugs, statins, were more widely prescribed, research suggests. The study of 175,000 patients, in the Lancet, said even very low-risk patients benefited from the medication.

Rare Gene Variants Making Drug Discovery Difficult, University of Washington

Thu, 05/17/2012 - 8:00pm
Rare DNA mutations are so plentiful in the human genome that they make it difficult to precisely identify the genetic switches that cause many common human diseases, two studies found. The data, released yesterday in the journal Science, shows that the vast majority of genetic variations found in people are rare and evolutionarily recent. Well-known DNA variations that are common across large populations...

Parents are Happier People Than Non-parents, University of California, Riverside Study

Thu, 05/17/2012 - 8:00pm
Contrary to recent scholarship and popular belief, parents experience greater levels of happiness and meaning in life than people without children, according to researchers from the University of California, Riverside, the University of British Columbia and Stanford University. Parents also are happier during the day when they are caring for their children than during their other daily activities...

Men Think Meat is Macho and Salad is for Wimps, University of Pennsylvania Study

Thu, 05/17/2012 - 8:00pm
MEN are put off eating a healthy diet because they feel meat is masculine and vegetables are for wimps, new research suggests. Researchers found men have a strong psychological association between meat and being macho and have the opposite association to salads and greens.